Greek Banks Close for a Week as Crisis Grows

The Wall Street Journal reported that Greece has ordered that its banks remain closed for the next week to the stem panicked cash withdrawals by depositors.  This drastic move indicates that the five year long Greek debt crisis is coming to an end game.

After the financial meltdown occurred in 2008, the economic folly of Europe’s single currency, the Euro, became apparent.  The European Union was created in an effort by Europeans to create a political climate that would lessen the likelihood of future wars on their continent.  This desire was a reaction to the carnage that inflicted on Europe during two world wars in the 20th century.  While the political idea was noble, little thought was given to the economic consequences that a central currency would lead to.  Those consequences are now playing out.

The Euro was destined to create an economic calamity because the political union was not accompanied by a truly economic union.  European countries maintain their own banking systems and Euro central bank was weak.

catharsisAfter the European Union and the Euro were created, the more efficient and stronger economies of North Europe, specifically Germany, obtained the lion share of benefit created by the Union. With nearly all European countries having a single currency, less efficient countries had their cost of labor increased in relation to more efficient ones.  As a result, the poorer countries had a artificially strong currency that enabled them to consume increased amounts of the more efficient countries’, i.e. Germany.  Through the Euro, Greece had to access to relatively cheap borrowing via an overall European credit rating that did not reflect the realities of individual countries.  As a result, Greece and other Southern European countries borrowed more funds than they could afford to pay back and use these funds to purchase imports from Germany and other exporting countries.

When the recession hit, Greece and other countries were unable to make payment on their debt.  This led to a battle between the creditor countries such as Germany and debtors like Greece.

For five years the Greece debt crisis has been a can kicked down the road.  Creditors including, Germany, have been unwilling to forgive Greece’s debt, even though Greece is not a position to repay it.  Had Greece continued to have its own currency, it would have devalued versus the German currency making its exports cheaper and more likely that it would have been able pay back its debt obligations.  The single currency has curtailed this natural rebalancing mechanism of sovereign debt. Continue reading

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